Digital money draining machine Steam Wallet is now live

steamwallet 

The Steam Wallet has officially been released along with the Team Fortress 2 Mann Co. Store, where players can now purchase items right within TF2.

With Steam Wallet, you can add value to your Steam account using any of the payment methods supported by Steam. Funds in your Steam Wallet may then be used to buy any item available in the Steam store on an in-game store. You can load up your Steam Wallet ahead of time, or wait until checkout. Also, different payment methods can be combined to make a single purchase.
Once you’ve added funds to your wallet, that money will be used by default for subsequent Steam store purchases. But if you’d prefer to reserve your wallet balance for in-game purchases of Mad Milk, Holy Mackerel and Bushwackas, no problem — simply select another payment method during checkout. Your wallet funds will be there the next time you’re ready to shop at Mann Co., or any other in-game store.
TF2’s Mann Co. Store is the first of many upcoming Steamworks in-game stores where Steam Wallet funds can be spent. See the TF2 Mannconomy FAQ for any questions specific to that game. Otherwise, feel free to give the wallet a try for your next Steam purchase, and please let us know what you think.

   

You can add funds by clicking here: http://store.steampowered.com/steamaccount/addfunds/

 wallet

“Steam subscribers can add funds in predetermined increments”

UK: £4, £8, £18, £35, £70
US: $5, $10, $25, $50, $100
EU: €5, €10, €25, €50, €100

You’ll also need to check out the new subscriber agreement, which states, among other things, that funds added to your wallet are non-refundable and non-transferrable.

 

So what do you think of it? Does it suck or not? Will you add funds to your wallet and buy wherever you want and whenever you want the game you really want but don’t have enough money at the moment?

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This Post Has 34 Comments

  1. Juzzy

    Wow what a bunch of whingers.

    A) Valve games are cheap
    B) Valve games are HEAVILY supported many years (CSS 5-10 years) (TF2 3 years and counting) for no money
    C) You don’t have to buy the items
    D) The items drop randomly and the weapons can be crafted
    E) Boycotting TF2 and removing private servers will not do a damn thing, most TF2 servers are run by gaming communities who do not bend to the will of the few whingers.
    F) All of the weapons have disadvantages too.

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  2. moo

    I think it is time to boycott TF2 as a signal that we do not want this.

    Pull all private volunteered run servers from the game and if there is no servers, nobody can really play :)

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  3. moo

    Team Fortress 2 is now rife with scammers scamming to get your wallet paid items.

    As far as I am concerned TF2 is dead. Future Valve games will be micropayment Win items also.

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  4. Dragoon

    @Fox
    http://www.next-gen.biz/features/valve-are-games-too-expensive
    This article was very interesting to read.

    Amazing the amount of money they make with Weekend deals. Despite or actually because of heavy discounts they earn more. Valve learned an important lesson. Lower prices earns you more money. :)

    Newell showed the results of a Left 4 Dead promotion Valve ran last weekend, which cut the price of the game in half to $25. The discount (and promise of new content for the game) rocketed sales of the game on Steam by 3,000 percent.

    “We sold more in revenue this last weekend than we did when we launched the product,” says Newell. “We were driving a huge uptick in revenue and attracting new customers.” And while people believe that we’re “screwing” retail, Newell showed that brick-and-mortar sales were unaffected by the online discount.

    This phenomenon is not limited to Valve games. Over the holidays, Steam discounted third-party titles. Sales increased 300 percent and units-sold increased by 600 percent.

    Still skeptical? Newell said that a weekend sale of one third-party title drove that game’s sales up by 18,000 percent and units-sold increased 36,000 percent. It energized the user base, says Newell. When the sale ended, baseline sales were double what they were prior to the weekend discount.

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